Anyone with even a passing interest in US official gold reserves will probably recall that the US Treasury claims to hold its gold (8,133.5 tonnes) over four locations in continental United States, namely at three US Mint facilities in Fort Knox (Kentucky), West Point (upstate New York), Denver (Colorado), and at the New York Fed (Manhattan, New York City).

The claimed gold holding locations and summary quantities held appear in a never-changing monthly Treasury report titled Status Report of U.S. Government Gold Reserve.

This report states that 4,583 tonnes of US Treasury gold are stored in the US Mints bullion depository in Fort Knox, 1,682 tonnes at the West Point bullion storage facility, and 1,364 tonnes in the US Mint facility in Denver, for a total of 7,628 tonnes of gold. The US Treasury further claims that 418 additional tonnes of its official gold reserves are held at the Federal Reserve Bank vault in New York. An additional 87 tonnes, a working stock figure (which never changes), comprises the balance.

While Fort Knox and the NY Fed vaults regularly take the limelight in terms of volume of media coverage, and to a lesser extent the West Point vaults do so also, there is very little if anything devoted to coverage of the US Treasury gold supposedly held in Denver. It is therefore of interest that none other than the US Mint on its own website recently ceased claiming that it stores gold bullion at its Denver facility.

Today, the United States Mint at Denver manufactures all denominations of circulating coins, coin dies, the Denver “D” portion of the annual uncirculated coin sets and commemorative coins authorized by the U. S. Congress. It also stores gold and silver bullion.

Less than a month later, on September 8, 2014, the above paragraph had been subtly changed to the following, and the words gold and had been removed:

Today, the United States Mint at Denver manufactures all denominations of circulating coins, coin dies, the Denver “D” portion of the annual uncirculated coin sets and commemorative coins authorized by the U. S. Congress. It also stores silver bullion.

Image courtesy of bullionstar.com